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Navigating court proceedings for fathers who want full custody

| Dec 9, 2018 | Paternity |

In most divorce cases that involve children, the court prefers a parenting plan that includes both parents actively participating in their offspring’s upbringing. Missouri is no different. However, there are times when it is in the best interest of the child for you, as their father, to have sole custody. At Turken & Porzenski, L.L.C. our experienced attorneys work with clients to ensure the best possible outcome for them and their children.

According to Verywell Family, sole custody, and sometimes even joint custody for fathers, is difficult to obtain. Here are a few tips that can help the court view giving you custody in a more positive light.

  • Make sure child support is up-to-date and on-time. Make sure you have records proving payments, even in informal arrangements. The court views a good track record favorably.
  • Maintain close ties and a good relationship with your child. Active participation in your child’s life is crucial. Attend school functions, touch base with your child’s teachers and be there for them when they need you.
  • Have a regular visitation schedule and stick to it. Keep a record of past visit dates and develop a parenting plan that can be submitted when the court decides on child custody arrangements.
  • Be realistic about your capabilities. If you have multiple responsibilities outside family obligations, can you handle full custody of your child?

Talking with fathers who have been through the process of getting custody of their children can offer insight and help you prepare for what the court and your child expect. Consider mediation as opposed to the adversarial atmosphere of a court hearing. This is often friendlier and easier to handle. Visit our webpage for more information on this topic.